Pupil premium

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement

The Pupil Premium Grant (PPG) is additional funding provided to schools to narrow the gap of attainment for some pupils. These children are from low income families who are currently known to be or have been eligible for free school meals in the last six years. It also supports children who have been 'looked after' continuously for more than six months or who have been adopted from care.

Whitegrove Primary School is fully committed to supporting pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support. At Whitegrove, our purpose in using pupil premium funding is to ensure that all the unique needs of our pupils are met and our children thrive and achieve the same high academic success and have access to all our enrichment activities. Our main focus is to improve the quality of teaching for all children, no matter their background, and to provide quality teaching for individuals and groups as required. No child should feel singled out due to the low number of PP children in our care but should grow in confidence, self-esteem and achieve their very best.

At Whitegrove we:

  • Recognise the fact that pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium are not an homogeneous group and cover a wide range of needs. As such the strategies we use to raise attainment will take these group and individual needs fully into account.
  • Use high quality teaching and learning as the preferred way to narrow the gaps in attainment in the first instance. We will also use high quality interventions with proven evidence of impact to assist our pupils who need additional support in a time limited way.

Strategic Plan for Pupil Premium Spending 2017-2018

In 2017-18, Whitegrove Primary School expects to receive £23,460 in pupil premium funding to provide additional academic and pastoral support for 4.0% of our school population.

 

Barriers to educational achievement What? Why? Success criteria used to measure impact of funding

Low self-esteem and poor self-image, leading to low expectations and a  lack of aspiration.

 

Low self-confidence and emotional resilience.

 

Vulnerable children are not ‘ready’ enough for learning.

 

Reading comprehension skills  for less able PP children are not yet good enough to support learning across the curriculum.

 

Implement a ‘Growth Mindset’ programme to complement and build upon our existing work on the 6Rs – our values for learning.

Research collated by the Educational Endowment Foundation (EEF) indicates that developing children’s meta-cognition and self-regulation have consistently high impact.

Children think about their own learning more explicitly – planning, monitoring and evaluating their own learning. Children express that they are better able to manage their own motivation towards learning. 

Continue work of Social Emotional HLTA in working with vulnerable children and their families.
LSAs to be trained and to deliver Emotional Literacy support interventions.

Continue Garden Apprentice programme and extra LSA support at breaks and lunchtimes.
Social emotional programmes have been effective this year in building children’s resilience. EEF Toolkit endorses positive impact of Social emotional interventions.

Children are more resilient in their social relationships and attitudes so that they are ‘ready’ for learning.

Parents are engaged and empowered.

High expectations and high-quality teaching, particularly in writing and maths, deepening the learning for all children.

Lessons are ‘tilted’ so that PP children are a priority focus for challenge, support and feedback.

CPD on effective feedback approaches for all teachers.

The Sutton Trust (2011) found that good teachers are especially important for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The EEF Toolkit shows that effective feedback has a very positive impact on learners.

Improving outcomes for PP children is a whole school priority.

Accelerated progress for PP children leads to improved proportions achieving beyond the expected standards.

Use pre-teaching of texts to support whole-class reading and to build vocabulary.

Use of guided reading strategies to build reading comprehension skills.

Use tracking data and individual evaluations of the needs of PP children to target strategies and interventions to meet their needs.

Monitor impact and cost-benefit through provision mapping and progress meetings.

EEF Toolkit shows good impact of reading and reading comprehension interventions on outcomes for PPG children.

PP children make accelerated progress in reading compared to their year group.

Attainment in writing and maths improve as a result of improved reading confidence.

The effect of our Pupil Premium spending will be measured by tracking the children's progress and attainment throughout the year, through discussions with children and their parents, and through measuring a baseline point and impact for interventions.
The next pupil premium strategy review will be in September 2018.

REVIEW of  Pupil Premium Spending in 2016-2017

In 2016-17, Whitegrove Primary School received £27,300 in pupil premium funding to provide additional academic and pastoral support for 5.0% of our school population.

Barriers to educational achievement What? Why? Success criteria used to measure impact of funding for 2016-17

Low self-esteem, self-confidence and emotional resilience.

 

Vulnerable children are not ‘ready’ enough for learning.

 

Low self-esteem leading to low expectations and a lack of aspiration.

 

Reading comprehension skills are not yet good enough to support learning across the curriculum.

 

a) Continue work of Social Emotional HLTA in working with vulnerable children and their families.

b) Continue Garden Apprentice programme and extra TA support at breaks and lunchtimes.

Social emotional programmes have been effective this year in building children’s resilience.

EEF Toolkit endorses positive impact of Social emotional interventions.

Children are more resilient in their social relationships and attitudes so that they are ‘ready’ for learning.

Parents are engaged and empowered.

c) High expectations and high-quality teaching, particularly in writing and maths, deepening the learning for all children.
d) Provide quality CPD for staff in writing and maths.
The Sutton Trust (2011) found that good teachers are especially important for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Improving outcomes for PP children is a whole school priority.

PPG children make more accelerated progress in writing and maths, thereby diminishing the difference.

Higher attaining PPG children make better than expected progress.

e) Classrooms and the Hub (library) provide inspiring and stimulating environments for the promotion of the love of reading.

f) Reading and comprehension are supported and guided in all curriculum areas.

EEF Toolkit shows good impact of reading and reading comprehension interventions on outcomes for PPG children.

PPG children make more accelerated progress in reading compared to their year group.

Attainment in writing and maths improve as a result of improved reading confidence.

g) Further development of provision mapping working with teaching staff.

Monitor the impact and cost effectiveness of interventions more closely.

Interventions are more closely matched to individual need.

PPG for interventions is used cost effectively.

Improving outcomes for PP children is a whole school priority.

The school has embraced the concept of ‘tilt’ focusing aspects of the school’s work on PP and other vulnerable children and how it will impact them. These include staff meetings, staff training, learning time with children (including marking and feedback focus), resource considerations and new initiatives.
‘Tilt’ has meant that all staff are aware of and consider PP children and are involved in their provision.

KS2 2016 Attainment and Progress 2016

Pupils eligible for PP (Whitegrove)

Pupils not eligible for PP (national average)

Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in reading  100% 71%
Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in writing 100% 76%
Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in mathematics  50%  75%
Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in reading, writing and mathematics  50%  61%
 Average progress in reading  7.68  0.0
 Average progress in writing  5.49  0.0
 Average progress in mathematics  0.03  0.0
 Average scaled score in reading and mathematics  103.0  104.1

 

Internal monitoring of teacher assessment data across the school shows that 89% of PP children made good or better progress over the year in reading, with 39% of these making accelerated progress. 89% of PP children made good or better progress over the year in writing with 33% making accelerated progress and 94% of PP children made good or better progress over the year in maths with 28% making accelerated progress.

a) and b)
Work has continued across the whole school in further embedding our 6Rs for learning, with a particular focus on building these. The Social Emotional HLTA undertook ELSA (emotional literacy support assistant) training, bringing fresh ideas and strategies to support vulnerable children. Aspects of this have been shared with other LSAs at regular training sessions, so that they can implement emotional literacy support in class. ELSA materials, supporting aspects of communication, self-esteem, friendship and social skills, have been purchased and have been trialed by LSAs to build emotional literacy skills with small groups of children, including vulnerable children, across the school. Our Garden Apprentice programme continues to support social skills and basic numeracy and literacy skills in a motivating and hands-on environment.
During the year, three guinea pigs came to join the school. They have proved very beneficial in helping children to be ready for school and their learning. For example, children who have had difficult mornings at home before coming to school and are not emotionally ready to engage with learning, spend 10-15 minutes stroking and feeding the guinea pigs, before returning to class in a much calmer state. Some vulnerable children were invited learn to care for their needs and help maintain their environment, including creating information about them for display to others, building their social skills and self-esteem.
All staff were trained on the importance of enabling effective transitions, particularly for vulnerable children changing year groups or their phase of education. All have worked hard to engage parents at all levels to ensure a smooth start to the new school year, holding additional briefing meetings and individual transition meetings where needed. PP children transitioned well to their new year groups and settings.
More LSAs have supported specific individuals and groups of children at break and lunchtimes, modeling positive social skills and being available to talk to as needed. This has supported children’s transitions back into class at the end of breaks and supported them to be more ready for learning.
Impact: PP children are building the strategies to improve their resilience and are more ready for learning as evidenced by the accelerated progress in their learning.

c) and d)
As part of the School Development Plan, there has been a whole school focus on ‘room at the top’ for all and curriculum development to support this. Disadvantaged children have been a key focus of all staff training on this. Teachers undertook training on ‘Deepening learning for all in Mathematics’ and further CPD on developing guided reading. Another whole school focus was on developing children’s writing skills, giving children strategies to achieve high standards in their writing. Writing assessment frameworks were developed for all year groups and these have supported children to identify independently the areas which they want to focus on and include in their writing, as well as better enabling teachers to give more focused feedback.
Small group and individual interventions in aspects of reading, spelling, writing and maths continue for PP children where learning gaps have been identified.
Impact: as shown above, PP children have made accelerated progress in writing and maths, thereby diminishing the difference. A greater proportion of PP children are now exceeding ARE.

e) and f)
Every classroom has an attractive and appealing reading corner where children can select books and share recommendations. Children in receipt of the PP are actively encouraged to read regularly, to talk about books and, if needed, are supported to do so daily with an adult. The library has been rearranged to make finding particular books easier, with clearly signed categories and author sections. PP children are supported and encouraged to choose engaging reading materials, to support building their vocabulary, comprehension and range of interests. Books specifically written to engage older, reluctant readers have been purchased to support the development of good reading habits.
Impact: as shown above, PP children have made accelerated progress in reading, thereby diminishing the difference. A greater proportion of PP children are now exceeding ARE.

g)
Provision mapping for all SEN, PP and other vulnerable groups has been revised with a new system implemented from September 2016. Evaluation shows that costs and impact can be more closely monitored than previously and that strategies and interventions can be more closely matched to individual needs.

Breakdown of Pupil Premium Grant Spending 2016 - 2017

Social, emotional and pastoral support  £          13,042
Extra TA playtime support £            3,676
Additional reading provision £            2,975
Additional maths provision £            2,427
1:1 teaching £            3,278
Additional writing provision £            1,560
Communication / vocabulary support £            2,306
Home learning support £               135
Trips / resources / extra-curricular support £               433
Training £            1,370
Total spend 2016 – 2017  £          31,202